3. Off-Broadway‎ > ‎

The Last Five Years

by Jason Robert Brown
Minetta Lane Theatre &
Northlight Theatre, Chicago
Daisy Prince, Director
2002
Drama Desk Award Nomination
 
Northlight Theater, Chicago
The Next Ten Minutes
Lauren Kennedy & Norbert Leo Butz 
 
Minetta Lane Theater
I Can Do Better Than That
Sherie Rene Scott
 
Minetta Lane Theater
See I'm Smiling
Norbert Leo Butz, Sherie Rene Scott
 
Northlight Theater, Chicago
I Can Do Better Than That
Lauren Kennedy
 
"Beowulf Borrit's elegant de Chiricoesque setting, which suggests gravity gone haywire, conveys a matching sense of time out of joint."
~Ben Brantley, The New York Times

"Beowulf Boritt's deliciously ironic setting features an empty wedding scene (chairs and flowers, etc.) set on a vertical plane so that it hovers over the unhappy couple.
~Chris Jones, Daily Variety

"Designer Beowulf Boritt has devised a powerfully poetic set-the upended room of a wedding party, with chairs and wedding flowers at right angles to the stage floor, and the shattered foundations of the marriage lying in a pile."
~Hedy Weiss, The Chicago Sun-Times

"Beowulf Boritt's imaginative setting involves a bird's eye view of a circular white patio arranged with chairs as if for a just-concluded wedding ceremony. The décor suggests something that is already over, yet only just beginning, too- an apt visual metaphor for an uncommon musical."
~Michael Sommers, the Newark Star-Ledger

"They do it almost without changing Beowulf Boritt's basic costumes, which consist of unprepossessing daytime togs. Nor is there much change in the eye-popping unit set that Boritt has designed. Standing on its side upstage and looking as if it's about to topple is a circular white patio with 26 white folding chairs arranged for wedding guests, viewed as if from the air. It's a brilliant metaphor for a marriage fated to collapse. As the show progresses, Boritt employs a turntable to send out a few pieces of furniture...a bed, a chair made of Jamie's best-selling books, a series of small, papier mâché automobiles. The designer's spare work is a marvelous example of how the less-is-more theory can enhance a musical good enough not to need artificial enhancement."
~David Finkle, Theatremania



To view a Lighting and Sound America article about the set, click here
 
 
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